Diary of a Curtain Twitcher

John Joiner asks for and, finally receives paper and pen. Sitting down he scribbles, at first, only anger and frustration onto the pages. But, soon the writer in him takes over and he begins the DIARY OF A CURTAIN TWITCHER, recording on the pages, the sequence of events that have put him: Under suspicion as a terrorist. Under lock and key in a military holding cell. Under the supervision of the unsympathetic military police.

Diary of a Curtain Twitcher - small

by Andy Davie

ISBN 978-0957985827
248 pages
$13.46

 
 

JOHN JOINER, an agoraphobic writer, has his secluded routine disturbed by the arrival of a temporary housekeeper, Maria. Together, they stumble across a plot to kill a very wealthy and powerful businessman. Things go from bad to worse when they try to intervene. Forced to battle his phobia, John and Maria find themselves on the run, unsure of whom they can trust, trying desperately to stop a murder and to stay alive.

Andy Davie has a strong voice and riveting writing style. The characters in Diary of a Curtain Twitcher become alive and real for the reader, pulling you deeper and deeper into the intrigue and action.

PAPERBACK

 
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ANDY DAVIE

 

andy davieAndy Davie was born in 1961 in London, England. He is a screenwriter known for Flash Back (2008) Cry Wolf (2011) and Time (2012). He has been married to Kathleen since 1992. They have one child. Andy grew up in a film industry family, but didn’t discover his passion for screen writing until 2001. He has penned several short and feature length screenplays.

Follow Andy on Twitter at twitter.com/Raven_110


Books for me are ways out of reality – this is one of the best I’ve read in a long time. I’m sure you will enjoy it too! Go for it!


EXTRACT

 

prologue

 

The stench of charred flesh and rubber clung to my senses. The taste in the back of my throat made me heave.

Resting my elbows on my knees, I covered my ears and closed my eyes, praying I would wake from this nightmare; but no awakening came. There was no release, no escape from the reality of my situation.

Sitting in the cell of a military guardhouse waiting to be taken to a civilian antiterrorist police station is a far cry from my usually quiet existence. At least for now I was inside, warm, dry, and safe, waiting for the Duty Officer to question me, before Special Branch officers took me away. I was reliably informed that it would be a long wait, since I wasn’’t likely to be taken before morning. At least I had plenty of time to contemplate my life, my future, and my recent past.

There didn’’t appear to be any way for me to clear my name, no matter how much I protested my innocence. I knew nobody would believe me. The only people, who might have been able to help, most likely wouldn’’t want to, for fear of being incriminated. Whichever way I looked at the problem, I failed to see a viable solution. What’s more, I knew there was a strong possibility that my life could come to an abrupt end, if I didn’’t maintain my self-control. The urge to give in to feelings of desperation could lead me to take drastic actions. Thoughts of grabbing my captors’ weapons and escaping flashed through my mind, like scenes from an action film on television. Pacing the concrete floor and deep breathing eventually helped me dismiss the insane thoughts.

Six people had lost their lives that cold, damp night. My good friend was, for all I knew, dead or dying. While I sat there alive and well, all I could think about was how I had reached this point in time and how I could record the story.

Military policemen are intimidating at the best of times. When they think you’re a terrorist, they’re positively scary. Wearing pistols on their belts and carrying machine guns, you instinctively know they would be only too happy to dispatch you from this world. Nevertheless, somehow I found the courage to badger my guards, and eventually they granted my request for a pencil and notepad.

Struggling to get comfortable, I started making shorthand notes to transpose into my diary later on, if I ever got to see it again. Thoughts about how I came to be in this predicament swirled around my mind, making it difficult to find a starting point. Having a fair idea of who was responsible for the deadly explosions I’d witnessed enabled me to imagine them creating their devastating devices. Anger and the need for retribution clouded my thoughts for a while. If I could have reached the people I suspected, I would very likely have tried to end their lives; but I am not a naturally violent person, so my only means of expression would be the written word. My notation became erratic, garbled lines of abuse, only serving to relieve my anger. When those angry clouds evaporated, my words started to form coherent sentences, and at last, the story started to take shape. Eventually I realized when it all began and took myself back to that time, just four days earlier.

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REVIEWS

 

5stars
Great Thriller

by Mary Elliott

 

I thoroughly enjoyed reading this book and put it in the category of a Dick Francis (my hero author). The suspense was great; the location descriptions so good I was there with the characters; the character descriptions excellent. The whole book took me on a funny, exciting, roller coaster ride of a read. Books for me are ways out of reality – this is one of the best I’ve read in a long time. I’m sure you will enjoy it too! Go for it!


5stars
Diary of a Curtain Twitcher

by Charlene Austin

 

John Joiner asks for and, finally receives paper and pen. Sitting down he scribbles, at first, only anger and frustration onto the pages. But, soon the writer in him takes over and he begins the DIARY OF A CURTAIN TWITCHER, recording on the pages, the sequence of events that have put him: Under suspicion as a terrorist. Under lock and key in a military holding cell. Under the supervision of the unsympathetic military police.

John Joiner’s deep emotional guilt over his part in the violent death of his fiance Sara, has escalated into a debilitating case of agoraphobia. It has been 3 years since he has been able to step from the confines of his house. Now, with an impressive array of technological equipment and his computers, John lives vicariously through his neighbors. Monitoring their lives and actions, he develops characters and plots for the books he writes as Jack Jenior.

Maria enters his life in a rustle of silk stockings, and from the first moments of frustrating aggravation his rapidly developing feelings and desire for her, begins to change John’s life. She becomes fascinated by his equipment and occupation when he notifies the police, foiling a robbery at a neighbors house.

When they uncover a murder plot, John, concerned how his “spying” will be perceived, and convinced the police will never believe them, they decide to investigate on their own and warn the victims.

Andy JW Davie has a strong voice and riveting writing style. The characters in DIARY OF A CURTAIN TWITCHER become alive and real for the reader, pulling you deeper and deeper into the intrique and action. I found myself anxiously turning the pages for the next twist and turn the author weaves into the attention grabbing plot of this MUST READ thriller.


5stars
There is a little twitcher in all of us

by Calista Cates

 

Davies has crafted a riveting story of a man driven to face his deepest, debilitating fear to save the lives of others. A Mystery Writer with a talent for electronic eavesdropping, John Joiner uncovers a murder plot in his own backyard. Fear of being labeled a “Curtain Twitcher” keeps Joiner from going to the authorities with his information. Now with the help, or hindrance of Maria Coruna, Joiner finds he must stop the plan before people die. Davies uses simplistic mastery to place the two into dangerous situations, and using believable solutions get them back out. “Diary of a Curtain Twitcher” is a gripping, must read book for mystery lovers. “Diary of a Curtain Twitcher” was my favorite new book of 2000.

 

 

LINKS

 

Φ Andy Davie at Twitter.